Challenged Hope

Grandmother raising Grandchildren with FASD in Hamilton Ontario Canada

FASD Memoirs

Two Decades Of Diapers

Barbara Studham’s memoir: Two Decades Of Diapers

Two Decades Of Diapers. 

Are you an individual with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, or a caregiver/support worker to an individual with FAS? Are you considering raising or fostering a child with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome? Or are you a reader simply interested in the effects of mental illness. If so, then for these, and many other reasons, Two Decades of Diapers is essential reading. During author, Barbara Studham’s, twenty years of single-handedly raising four grandchildren with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, the temptation to run from this often uncontrollable mental illness and all the struggles it brought into her world, was significant. Despite her grandchildren’s strengths, their Fetal Alcohol Syndrome caused severe behavioral issues, eventually overwhelming her parenting abilities resulting in a breakdown of the family unit she had fought so hard to maintain. Offering an insight into the challenges of FAS, Two Decades of Diapers is a down-to earth, no holds barred reference to the struggles associated with mental illness. In her memoir, Barbara describes the challenges her adopted daughter with FAS endured, her teen pregnancy, how Barbara became a grandmother raising grandchildren, and the crises, shattered dreams, and strength and love they share.  AVAILABLE FROM AMAZON.

FAS: The Teen Years

Now Available: Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, The Teen Years. Barbara Studham’s memoir sequel to Two Decades Of Diapers

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: The Teen Years is the sequel to author, Barbara Studham’s, first memoir: Two Decades Of Diapers. In each memoir, Barbara gives insight into how family life can be ruthlessly disrupted by behavior disorders caused by Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: a mental illness caused by prenatal exposure to alcohol. Barbara Studham spent twenty years raising grandchildren with FAS. Through her wealth of experience with the disorder, she leads us through her desperation, fears, hopes, and prayers while coping with her grandchildren’s teen years. However, Barbara would be the first to admit that while FAS brought a whirlwind of emotions into her life, her grandchildren’s struggle to cope with mental illness far outweighs any trauma she has endured. Often labelled defiant, odious, caustic, and wayward, individuals with FAS are more victims of brain damage overwhelmed by the demands of everyday life, than the disposable people society deems them. If you are an individual considering adopting or fostering a child with FAS, a mental health worker, or someone who is interested in learning more about this distressing disorder, then Two Decades Of Diapers, and, Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: The Teen Years are essential reading. AVAILABLE FROM AMAZON.

 

Barbara Studham’s memoirs, fiction, and children’s FASD picture book series, are available from AMAZON

http://www.amazon.com/author/barbarastudham

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2 thoughts on “FASD Memoirs

  1. I just read Two Decades of Diapers – could not put it down! You are such an inspiration – I have an AD age 9 who has just been diagnosed with FASD…listened to your podcast and read your memoir…I am trying to learn/prepare as much as I can as this was not disclosed to us when we adopted her…thank you!

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    • Thank you for your comment. Too often I hear from adoptive parents who were not told their child has FASD or even if there was the possibility for FASD given their biological background. This is has to change. Adoption agencies must be accountable where potential disabilities are concerned. Thank you for liking my book. I certainly wish you all the best in the future!

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